SAVE THE DATE! September 19th, 2020 we will again recognize and celebrate African americans in the horse industry! Click here for the details

BLACK LIVES MATTER

Phoenix Rising Lex was born out of an effort to recognize and bring to the forefront of daily conversation, the lives of Black Horsemen whose contributions have formed the backbone of the horse industry both in Kentucky and beyond. This industry was quite literally built upon the backs of the enslaved labor of these men. Later, those Black horsemen who experienced some level of fortune, and even fame, were driven from the industry by Jim Crow racism, their accomplishments quickly forgotten.

All of these men and their stories matter. No matter whether it is the life of an enslaved groom, or the life of a successful Black jockey, their’s are all stories of racism and inequality, infections in a country and its culture historically defined but the color of one’s skin.

Our group decided to call ourselves Phoenix Rising because we saw the need to tell these men’s stories and raise them up out of the ashes of a whitewashed history — because Black Lives Matter. And our shared history matters even though it can be hard to discuss and difficult to understand. We all need to know this history and understand the impact it has on our lives, on our culture, and on our future.

The current events of 2020 happening all around us matter because they are based on so many terrible things that have happened in the past. Phoenix Rising Lex was created around the fact that Black Lives Matter and the Board of Directors and members of this organization stand in solidarity with any movement that strives for a better, more equal and just world each and every day. Because Black Lives Matter.

 

 

 

 

 

WHAT WE’VE DONE

  • Attained our 501(c)(3), non-profit IRS status in January 2017
  • Hosted its 3rd annual Phoenix Festival at the Isaac Murphy Memorial Art Garden. Themed Honoring the Past, Inspiring the Future, honorees were the late Thoroughbred owner and trainer, and civil rights activist Oscar Dishman, Jr., and entrepreneur and educator Jeremy Reese, founder and operator of Frankie’s Corner, a program to teach inner city youth the basics of working in the horse industry. We also highlighted the historic 1891 Kentucky Derby, the first and only to be captured by an African American jockey, trainer and owner. Past recipients include the successful Black jockey, James Long, Gene Carter, and Man o’ War’s last two grooms, Will Harbut and Cunningham Graves.
  • Sponsored a week-long visit to Lexington, including a free lecture at the Lyric Theater, by Dr. Katherine Mooney, professor of history at Florida State University, and author of the award-winning book, Race Horse Men: How Slavery and Freedom were Made at the Racetrack.
  • Reprinted 300 copies of “Racing Heritage; African American Trainers, Jockeys and the Kentucky Association Track,” Lexington’s only brochure exploring the history of the Kentucky Association track and the significance of its Black horsemen in the growth of the Bluegrass horse industry and Lexington’s historic East End neighborhood.
  • Continued our support for the Charles Young Community Center, and sponsored ornaments for the community Christmas tree in Charles Young Park.
  • Supported and promoted the efforts of the International Museum of the Horse in their production of Central Kentucky’s only permanent African American museum exhibit, “Black Horsemen of the Kentucky Turf” at the Kentucky Horse Park
  • With the generous support of Hall Media, developed our logo, established a new email address, and social media presence, and our new Phoenix Rising Lex website. Hall Media also arranged for TV and radio interviews related to all functions mentioned.
  • Participated in Lexington’s “Roots and Heritage Festivals.”